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brxkenpetal:

this-one-moment:

He just accepts it right away.

this makes me so happy and idk why

brxkenpetal:

this-one-moment:

He just accepts it right away.

this makes me so happy and idk why

stfuprolifers:

stfuconservatives:

foxes-of-harrow:

theymightbebeatles:

lavender-labia:









I WILL NEVER STOP LOSING IT AT “FUCK YOU LADY.”

Oh my god the “FUCK YOU LADY” is the best

YESSS THIS POST IS BACK

The physics and “FUCK YOU LADY” are definitely my favorite ones.

stfuprolifers:

stfuconservatives:

foxes-of-harrow:

theymightbebeatles:

lavender-labia:

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I WILL NEVER STOP LOSING IT AT “FUCK YOU LADY.”

Oh my god the “FUCK YOU LADY” is the best

YESSS THIS POST IS BACK

The physics and “FUCK YOU LADY” are definitely my favorite ones.

carnivaloftherandom:

saathi1013:

bana05:

I wanted my first-year film students to understand what happens to a story when actual human beings inhabit your characters, and the way they can inspire storytelling. And I wanted to teach them how to look at headshots and what you might be able to tell from a headshot. So for the past few years I’ve done a small experiment with them.

Some troubling shit always occurs.

It works like this: I bring in my giant file of head shots, which include actors of all races, sizes, shapes, ages, and experience levels. Each student picks a head shot from the stack and gets a few minutes to sit with the person’s face and then make up a little story about them. 

Namely, for white men, they have no trouble coming up with an entire history, job, role, genre, time, place, and costume. They will often identify him without prompting as “the main character.” The only exception? “He would play the gay guy.” For white women, they mostly do not come up with a job (even though it was specifically asked for), and they will identify her by her relationships. “She would play the mom/wife/love interest/best friend.” I’ve heard “She would play the slut” or “She would play the hot girl.” A lot more than once.

For nonwhite men, it can be equally depressing. “He’s in a buddy cop movie, but he’s not the main guy, he’s the partner.” “He’d play a terrorist.” “He’d play a drug dealer.” “A thug.” “A hustler.” “Homeless guy.” One Asian actor was promoted to “villain.”

For nonwhite women (grab onto something sturdy, like a big glass of strong liquor), sometimes they are “lucky” enough to be classified as the girlfriend/love interest/mom, but I have also heard things like “Well, she’d be in a romantic comedy, but as the friend, you know?” “Maid.” “Prostitute.” “Drug addict.”

I should point out that the responses are similar whether the group is all or mostly-white or extremely racially mixed, and all the groups I’ve tried this with have been about equally balanced between men and women, though individual responses vary. Women do a little better with women, and people of color do a little better with people of color, but female students sometimes forget to come up with a job for female actors and black male students sometimes tell the class that their black male actor wouldn’t be the main guy.

Once the students have made their pitches, we interrogate their opinions. “You seem really sure that he’s not the main character – why? What made you automatically say that?” “You said she was a mom. Was she born a mom, or did she maybe do something else with her life before her magic womb opened up and gave her an identity? Who is she as a person?” In the case of the “thug“, it turns out that the student was just reading off his film resume. This brilliant African American actor who regularly brings houses down doing Shakespeare on the stage and more than once made me weep at the beauty and subtlety of his performances, had a list of film credits that just said “Thug #4.” “Gang member.” “Muscle.” Because that’s the film work he can get. Because it puts food on his table.

So, the first time I did this exercise, I didn’t know that it would turn into a lesson on racism, sexism, and every other kind of -ism. I thought it was just about casting. But now I know that casting is never just about casting, and this day is a real teachable opportunity. Because if we do this right, we get to the really awkward silence, where the (now mortified) students try to sink into their chairs. Because, hey, most of them are proud Obama voters! They have been raised by feminist moms! They don’t want to be or see themselves as being racist or sexist. But their own racism and sexism is running amok in the room, and it’s awkward.

This for every time someone criticizes how characters of color and female characters of color especially are treated in text and by subsequent fandoms.  It’s never “just a television/movie/book”. It’s never been ”just”.

…and by subsequent fandoms." <— bless this addition.

This one is always worth reblogging.
When I say, “Representation matters,” it’s not just the presence of PoC, women, PwD, LGBTQIA, in narrative, it’s the roles are those characters are occupying.

The hall of mirrors that is the interplay between fiction and real life becomes a negative feedback loop with real consequences, because we internalize things and then we act them out.

Storytelling is a powerful thing. What stories are we telling, and why?

carryonmy-assbutt:

castielsunderpants:

supagirl:

samandriel:

napoleonbonerhard:

caresaggressively:

solluxander:

I WANT TO GOOGLE A SONG BUT ITS A SOUNDTRACK AND I DONT KNOW THE NAME OR THE MOVIE AND I CANT GOOGLE THE SPECIFIC NOTES I HATE MY LIFE

THERE’S A SITE WHERE YOU CAN HUM IT THOUGH

I AM CRYING THE FUTURE IS NOW

I DIDNT BELIEVE IT WOULD WORK BUT

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MOTHER FUCKING SORCERY

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I didn’t believe this…so I tried

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OMG

tumblr has opened to my eyes to so many things

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HOLY SHIT

mediamattersforamerica:

The issue with Fox’s misogyny toward female pilots is that it reinforces the very thing military women already deal with from male counterparts.

And veterans are speaking out.

Read an open letter to Fox about Eric Bolling’s “boobs on the ground” remark, written by U.S. military veterans from the Truman Nat’l Security project:

Before you jump to the standby excuse that you were “just making a joke” or “having a laugh,” let the men amongst our number preemptively respond: You are not funny. You are not clever. And you are not excused. Perhaps the phrase “boys will be boys”—inevitably uttered wherever misogyny is present—is relevant. Men would never insult and demean a fellow servicemember; boys think saying the word ‘boobs’ is funny.

The less obvious implication of your remarks, however, is that by offending an ally and cheapening her contribution, you are actively hurting the mission. We need to send a clear message that anyone, male or female, who will stand up to ISIS and get the job done is worthy of our respect and gratitude.

We issue an apology on your behalf to Major Al Mansouri knowing that anything your producers force you to say will be contrived and insincere. Major, we’re sincerely sorry for the rudeness; clearly, these boys don’t take your service seriously, but we and the rest of the American public do.

Disclosure: Lisa Reed is a Media Matters employee. 

pixalry:

The Essential Pokemon Amigurumi Collection: Part 2 - Created by Johnny Navarro

Johnny has added some fantastic new creations to his Pokemon collection, and they’re all available for sale on his Etsy Shop. You can also follow him on Facebook for more updates on his work!

Check out Part 1 here